Directions

Sign Up / Log In | Map Navigation | Bookmarks | Bringing Up A Forecast | Printing A Forecast | Forecast Details




Signing Up and Logging In

Click on the SIGN UP link. Enter your email address, review the terms and conditions, then click Sign Up! A password will be emailed to you. Once signed up, click on the LOG IN link. Use your email address and the password sent to you to enter the site.

After login you will be presented with a map of all New Zealand.

If your computer's location could be determined, the map will then zoom to your location.

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Navigating The Map

Use the familiar arrows and zoom-bar on the left-hand side to pan and zoom the map.

You may also "box zoom" to a specific area by holding down the Shift key and drawing a rectangle on the map. This is very useful if you can see the region in your map view and know where you want to zoom in.

You may also use the Search link to enter an address, a city, or other landmark. It's not perfect, but it's pretty good.



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Selectable Tools

In the upper-right is a selector, which shows the various tools you can use. Many of these will be described in more detail, but here is a summary of all of them.


Pan & Drag

The default mode. When you drag the mouse across the map, the map will move. When you double-click the map, it will zoom in a notch.

Query

When this is selected, the same Pan & Drag tools still work. But there's a change: you can click the map to see information about what's there. This doesn't work for every feature and every layer, but does cover schools, parcels, and a few other features.

Forecast

In this mode, the Pan & Drag tools still work. A click to the map will generate a forecast, popping it up in a panel. The forecast panel is described in more detail below.

New Bookmark

In this mode, the Pan & Drag tools still work. Clicking the map will save a new bookmark to your profile. Bookmarks are a convenient way to save a location for a quick return later. Bookmarks are described in more detail below.

Measure

When the Measure tool is used, the Pan & Drag tools are disabled. Click on the map to begin drawing a line, and keep clicking the map to continue drawing more line segments. The total distance of the lines will be displayed in the readout, just under the tool selector.

You may double-click to stop drawing, then click again to start a new measurement.

Draw shelter belt

When the digitizer is active, the Pan & Drag tool is disabled. You then draw on the map, laying down line segments representing shelter belts (that is, obstructions which stop the drift of chemicals downwind, such as hedges).

You may double-click to stop drawing, at which time your new feature will be saved and will appear on the right. The digitizer is described in more detail below.

Draw sensitive area

When the digitizer is active, the Pan & Drag tool is disabled. You then draw on the map, laying down a polygon representing sensitive areas where chemical drift would be undesirable. This may be schools, sensitive plants, wells, or any other feature of interest.

You may double-click to stop drawing, at which time your new feature will be saved and will appear on the right. The digitizer is described in more detail below.

Draw spray zone

When the digitizer is active, the Pan & Drag tool is disabled. You then draw on the map, laying down a polygon representing an area where chemicals are to be applied.

You may double-click to stop drawing, at which time your new feature will be saved and will appear on the right. The digitizer is described in more detail below.

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The Forecast Panel

To bring up a forecast, select the Forecast tool, then click the map.
You can bring up a forecast for any location, even if you have not saved a bookmark.



The X axes are the same for all graphs: the time, starting now and going the length of the forecast.
Times are given in the local time for the location selected, and nighttime is depicted by the greyish backgrounds.



From bottom to top, these graphs are:

Spray Risk: The bottom graph shows overall spray drift conditions, accounting for humidity, wind speed, rainfall, and other factors. Green squares represent good conditions and bad conditions are denoted by a red square.

Wind Forecast: The next graph above this shows forecast wind speed and direction. Note the red and pink squares along the top. These are based on the "directions of concern" which you defined for that bookmark (see the Bookmarks section for more info). When the wind is blowing in a direction of concern, a red square is shown; when the wind is blowing within 45 degrees of a direction of concern, a pink square is shown. This gives a visual indication when the wind is blowing in a direction which would be problematic. In this example we chose North as a direction of concern, and you can see the red and pink squares indicating when the wind is blowing north or close to north.

Temperature and Rainfall: The next graph above this shows forecast temperature, rainfall and the chance of rainfall. In this example a periods of light rainfall is expected on March 14th with a probability or chance of about 70%. During this time the temperature is expected to be in the mid to high 30s. During the rest of the period, there is no rainfall forecast, only a 10% chance of getting something which will be close to 0 anyway.

Humidity and Leaf Wetness: The top graph shows expected humidity and leaf wetness. The humidity is self-explanatory. When the leaf wetness indicator shows a high, blue mark, conditions are such that liquid water will be present on leaves.

Using the information from the bottom two graphs, ideal spraying conditions away from sensitive areas can be defined. In this example a spraying window exists on March 18th around 8pm local time, a combination of good spraying conditions with wind headed away from sensitive areas. The forecast conditions would minimize chemical drift caused by environmental conditions and the least risk to sensitive areas.

Using the information provided in the top two graphs, an infection event from wet weather diseases may be predicted. Apple growers for example will be concerned with apple scab early in the season, while grape growers may be concerned with infection from botrytis, and urban parks maintenance people may be concerned about turf diseases. As a general rule these diseases are best controlled with preventative rather than curative actions.

Additional Tools & Formats: These links will provide the forecast in alternate formats, for use in other programs, for printing and archival purposes, etc.

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Bookmarks

To create a new bookmark, select the New Bookmark tool and click the map.
This saves the location and places an X on it, and the bookmark will appear in your list on the upper-right.

A bookmark may have directions of concern associated with it. These directions indicate directions to which chemical drift would be problematic. For example, if there were a school or a residential area to the east and northeast, these may be directions of concern.

When you bring up a forecast, the wind forecast will color the forecast with red and pink tags when the wind is blowing in one of these directions of concern. See the Forecast section of this manual for more details.

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Digitized Features: Spray Zones, Shelter Belts, Sensitive Areas

To digitize a feature, select one of the Draw tools from the tool selector. This puts the map in drawing mode. Click the map repeatedly to lay down line segments (in the case of Shelter Belts) or to stretch the polygon into shape (in the case of Spray Zones and Sensitive Areas).

When you have drawn a feature, it will be shown in your inventory on the right-hand side.

You will notice on the map that your digitized Spray Zones have a perimeter around them. You can change the size of this perimeter by changing the "Danger Zone Buffer" field for the spray zone. This will cause the map to redraw with the new perimeter width.

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